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Signs of Progress in Traffic Safety - Shared screen with speaker view
Heidi Simon
23:51
Please feel free to use this chat function to share questions and comments for the panel. We will get to as many questions as possible at the end of the presentations.
Kurt Kaminer
26:11
Love that raised crosswalk meme
Alexander Warner
33:39
I'm excited to see the updates coming to the MUTCD. It is one of the most referenced document in my field. Do you know how we can be notified of the progress?
James DeCarli
33:43
Regarding speed limits. Vehicle manufactures are designing vehicles to be faster and 0-60mph in under 2 seconds. Enforcement and prosecution can be a challenge, leading to promoting excessive speeding driver behavior. Any thoughts on using technology in vehicles with sensors to ensure vehicles are unable to drive beyond local posted speed limits?
Lindell Price
34:50
We also expect drivers to drive very near the 85th percentile speed limit. The most frequent reason that older drivers fail behind the wheel driving test in California is driving more than 10 miles below the speed limit. A California Highway patrolman also told me that drivers are supposed to drive the speed limit. Merely permitting slower speeds would be helpful.
Kurt Kaminer
34:55
Very impressed with the approach. You nailed it with the absurdity angle. There's a lot of strength through light satire, especially when executed humorously. It breaks through the clutter, gets attention, and really gets people to take action.
Haley Dougherty
36:27
DOTs are anxiously awaiting new guidance for setting speed limits... With the Safe System approach, DOTs do not have much impact on safe speeds aside from enforcement and education. A lot of things associated with speed have to go through legislature and time is too valuable to most. Definitely looking forward to new guidance as well as the MUTCD updates.
Michael Swire
36:57
Lots of people argue that lowering speed limits is not a good strategy - pointing to low compliance rates and the undoubtable power of new infrastructure/traffic calming. I disagree, citing that many people are influenced by speed limits and that speed limit changes can be faster and lower cost than infrastructure projects. Do you have good data that shows speed limit changes improve safety and increase comfort? Tx!
Haley Dougherty
39:19
do you have links or documents on what those bills say?
Kurt Kaminer
39:50
On Michael's note above - I would love to see any study that compares the effectiveness of speed approaches based on the context of the street. For instance, whether certain street designs (e.g., causeways) might be better served by more separation from bike/ped infrastructure rather than speed reduction.
Amy Cohen
40:17
NYSafeStreets.org - has info on all the bills, the 100+ coalition members, etc.
Dongho Chang
40:47
Speed limit reduction with just signs with safety improvements can be found in this report: https://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/SDOT/VisionZero/SpeedLimit_CaseStudies_Report.pdf
Jared Leute
41:00
I would be curious what the correlation of the size of the vehicle is to pedestrian fatalities. Our vehicles are very large compared to some of the other countries on that graph showed. Also, more round-a-bouts could help alleviate overall aggressive driving.
Suzann Flowers
41:47
I would be curious how any states such as NY moved towards allowance of this type of program. MI has no law for this type of program. Any examples of how states went from a MI (no cameras allowed) to cameras allowed, thank you in advance.
Haley Dougherty
42:06
larger vehicles often hit VRUs closer to the body, rather than legs, causing more extensive damage. Not to mention the difference between 20 and 50 mph
Lindell Price
43:54
Is there an effort to change traffic fines to a percent of the drivers income to prevent disproportionate impact to low income drivers? This would also help to address use of of the 85th percentile use in response to use of traffic fines for income generation.
Alex Engel
44:22
Unfortunately, because the MUTCD is a federal regulation, we have as much public information as you do on the updates (federal law limits how officials are permitted to host meetings on 'active rulemakings’). That said, we were encouraged by Pollack's comments at our conference earlier this month, and FHWA has said that the next edition of the MUTCD (where we hope many or most of our comments will be incorporated) will be released by May 2023.
Alex Engel
45:06
Re: some requested resources. Designing for All Ages and Abilities provides guidance on which bike facilities to use based on the street type and use, and City Limits is our speed limit setting guidance for urban areas.
Alex Engel
45:21
Size of vehicles is a huge concern (we created a campaign to urge updates to NCAP as a first step–the vehicles most deadly to pedestrians universally receive 4 and 5-star federal safety ratings). That said, Canada has larger vehicles with better traffic safety outcomes, so the issue is multifaceted.
Miriam Fisher
45:47
live in NYC and member of TA and Family for Safe Streets. I have been hit by yellow cab, in coma, in and out of hospitals and surgery for years.Long time anticar activist. Support and testified for more bike lines. But also concerned about bikes running lights, wrong way, on sidewalk. Live in Chelsea which has good and safer bike lanes. Mid Aug pedestrian killed by hit & run biker on 22nd St/.8th Av. How can we support more biking but monitoring for safety. ?Licensing would make for accountability and cameras would identify .argument that licensing would reduce riders and numbers bring safety irrelevant in NYC where over 100000 bikers daily. Police in area say they cannot monitor bikers at community meetings. What can TA do? Have balance problems and freq almost hit. Disability groups have testified at City Council Transportation meets about concerns about dangers from bikes. senior who is knocked over & hip has serious disabling injury
Robert Vogel
46:24
It is very possible the next MUTCD update will include a higher threshold for detailed traffic studies and local considerations can be considered in more detail.
John Manix
48:27
As a traffic engineer, I recommend more studies like the Seattle study to get approval of speed limit reductions.
Lindell Price
51:34
My personal experience since California instituted a 3-foot requirement when passing bicyclists is motorists crossing double yellow lines, often completely into the opposing lane. More emphasis is needed on slowing down and waiting to pass a bicyclist until it is safe to pass.
Suzann Flowers
53:48
bike
Kathryn Broadbelt
53:49
bike
Jessica Bennett
53:49
BIke
Jen Maddux
53:49
bike
Roxanne Welch
53:50
train
Pete Van Saun
53:50
bike
Kurt Kaminer
53:50
Bike + Bus + Train!
Patti Stark
53:51
walk
Patti Pittman
53:51
walk
John Goodpater
53:52
driving
Dustin Pellegrini
53:52
bike
Andrea Eales
53:53
Walk
Esteban-Muir, Ruth (NHTSA)
53:53
Bike
Lindell Price
53:54
walk
Alex Engel, NACTO
53:54
Walking
Sandra Enness
53:54
Train
Lena Nguyen
53:54
bus/train
Patricia Middleton
53:54
Driving
James Flowers
53:54
Driving
Donna McEntee
53:55
walk
Mia Hendricks
53:55
walk
Dongho Chang
53:55
Biking
Michael Giroux
53:55
Drive
Mario Mairena
53:55
Drive
Erik Landfried
53:56
walk
Lei Ma
53:56
walk
Tara Kelley-Baker
53:56
Walk
Lauren Junker
53:56
Walk
Kristin Kingsley
53:57
walk
Aaron Gatdula
53:57
Train
Tim King
53:57
walk
Holly Dalby
53:58
Driving
Thomas Woodhall
53:58
streetcar
Gracelyn Ferris
53:59
Drive
Ayla Schermer
53:59
Bike
clkelley
54:00
Drive
Courtney Bates
54:00
Drive
Robyn [KDOT]
54:01
Driving
Sarah Davis
54:01
walk
Cathy Slade
54:01
Drive
Marianne Hernandez
54:02
Bike
James Gattis
54:02
drive
Ryan Pierce
54:02
Drive
Rachel Ruhlen
54:02
scooter
Cathy Silberman
54:02
walk
Allen Bell
54:02
drive
Redwan Adem
54:03
drive
Alexander Warner
54:03
Bike
Vago Galounis
54:04
Flying
Ingrid Vandervort
54:04
Drive
Robert Vogel
54:04
Drive
Tonia Wilson
54:04
bike
Michael Meeks
54:05
walk
Christopher Culpepper
54:05
drive
Amy Johnson Ely
54:05
bike
Kylene Swackhamer
54:06
Driving
James DeCarli
54:06
walk + bike
Tim King
54:06
drive too
Monica Williamson
54:06
walk
Amanda Hicks c/o City of Memphis
54:06
Driving
Bryan Hurst
54:07
Motorcycle
Miriam Fisher
54:08
walk walk walk
Maura Fitzgerald
54:08
drive
Norberto Cabrera
54:10
Drive
Ashley Mills
54:10
drive
Eveline Roy
54:12
bike
Janelle Shanahan
54:12
drive
Matt Peters
54:12
drive
Todd Hartline
54:13
Walk
Nina Leung
54:15
driving
Cleaveran Law
54:15
Bike
ELAINE OLMOS
54:16
walk driving
Tim King
54:18
broom
John Manix
54:20
sailing
Chris Henry
54:20
Motorcycle
Kurt Kaminer
54:24
Someone said "streetcar" - love it!
Doug Mowbray
54:25
Skipping.
Colin Brander
54:26
Walking or running
Ingrid Vandervort
54:27
Horse is really my fave
Eric Howell
54:29
🚲
Michael Swire
54:31
Ice skates
Jared Leute
54:31
Bike
Matthew Cambron
54:32
Motorcycle
Karon Trenaman
54:32
walk and train
Gail Landy
54:37
Gail bus and train
Pamela Houghtaling
54:38
Drive
Alex Engel, NACTO
54:40
Rollerblading!
Janelle Shanahan
54:43
would love if it was biking, but don't feel safe next to traffic
Jenny O'Connell
54:51
re: justifications for speed limit reductions @michael @kurt @john: there are a few cities that have looked at speed limit reductions on speed and crashes - Boston, Portland, Seattle, and Toronto stand out as a few. It's also worth noting that a lot of the speed limit reductions across the US are new, so few before/after studies have been done. And also notably, a lot of cities are prevented from reducing speed limits on higher speed roads where the vast majority of serious injuries and fatalities are taking place.
Tim King
54:53
dragon
Jenny O'Connell
55:49
On speed limits, it's also worth saying that the intent of lowering speed limits from 25 mph to 20 mph in many places is less of a traffic calming tool than it is a communications tool - "we know 20 mph is a safer, more appropriate speed for the places where people live". Also, reducing the speed limit is a critical step in better engineering - we hear from planners all the time that they simply cannot implement safety infrastructure like speed humps or traffic circles because the speed limit (usually 30 mph) is too high for a safety treatment to be...safe. Basically, some engineers will say that if a speed limit indicates a 30 mph speed, traffic calming treatments have to retain that speed, even if that speed is what's resulting in serious injuries or deaths.
Kurt Kaminer
59:06
Thanks, Jenny. Had a very specific road in mind that's used as a highway but classified as an arterial. It actually had a 10mph speed cut recently for the safety of people riding, but most of us on the bike/ped end agree that proper protected bike lanes are an absolute necessity. However, given the design of the road, I'm curious if a significantly protected design would negate the need for the speed reduction, thus getting more drivers onboard with the idea of a lane reduction for the protection instead. So far, the engineering end of things isn't so much a problem except the difficulty of getting bollards OK'ed.
Michael Swire
59:11
At the local level, what type of organization is most effective in slowing traffic and making the streets safer for all people (even those in cars!)? I bike and belong to several bike orgs. They are great and pretty effective. I can't help wonder, however, whether bike organizations would be most effective for general street change. Most people don't bike and many people hate cyclists : ( The vast majority of people, however, know someone who has been a victim of traffic violence or had a very close call.
Jenny O'Connell
01:01:07
@kurt that's a great question! The City Limits guidance has a matrix showing that streets with better/more protection for people walking and biking can indeed tolerate slightly higher speed limits than streets where there's a lot of modal mixing
Kurt Kaminer
01:01:54
Michael, I've experienced this locally, and I dare say it's best for an org to frame around safe streets with bike/walk/roll (and even driving) within the safe streets discussion.
Kurt Kaminer
01:02:01
Hard to say "no" to safe streets.
Kurt Kaminer
01:02:53
@Jenny, do you have a link to that? It would be exceptionally helpful down here in Miami.
Kurt Kaminer
01:03:48
Stephanie, these are such fantastic wins. Congrats to you and the WABA. Game changing.
Jenny O'Connell
01:04:21
Yes! you can download the guide here: https://nacto.org/safespeeds/. And the explanation for the matrix i'm referring to starts on page 58
Alex Engel, NACTO
01:04:44
@Michael, I saw that Amy Cohen is here. She's co-founder of Families for Safe Streets and a very effective advocate.
Kurt Kaminer
01:04:46
Oh, you were referring to the NACTO guide! Fantastic. Our Public Works director is ex-NACTO.
Eric Howell
01:05:04
yes, so true about fatigue
Jenny O'Connell
01:05:05
ha yes sorry! I'm jenny o'connell, from nacto 🙂
K. Erin Hohmann
01:06:09
Thank you for validating my feelings. Getting no where with municipality and it is VERY discouraging. Fabulous webinar, THANK YOU.
Kurt Kaminer
01:06:39
No worries, Jenny - bouncing between a million things at the moment and trying to keep everything straight. I should have known.
Lindell Price
01:07:19
Does anyone know of efforts to fully incorporate transportation education throughout an education curriculum? We currently have add-on programs, such as Safe Routes to Schools; these are add-on programs and place an extra burden on teachers, principals, etc. Transportation education can and should be included in many subject areas, fully incor the curriculum.
Lindell Price
01:08:02
... incorporated into the curriculum.
Amy Johnson Ely
01:08:37
Oregon's elementary school curriculum has bike safety education embedded, which is integrated into standard curriculum. Hopefully that's not the only state.
Haley Dougherty
01:08:44
Great point, Lindell! Kansas has a Driver's ed reimbursement program but we struggle with coverage across the state.
Kurt Kaminer
01:08:52
Lindell, we've been starting to work "Education about Infrastructure" into our youth educational curriculums at the UHealth BikeSafe program and UHealth WalkSafe program
Kurt Kaminer
01:09:23
@Lindell, here's an example: https://iwalksafe.org/virtuallearning/
Andrea Hamre
01:09:57
FHWA website: "the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act directs USDOT to update the MUTCD by no later than May 15, 2023, and at least every 4 years thereafter to promote the safety, inclusion, and mobility of all road users."
Kurt Kaminer
01:09:59
Check out Lesson 3 and Lesson 5 which take conventional shared-responsibility messaging and throws it on it's head.
Andrea Hamre
01:10:04
https://mutcd.fhwa.dot.gov/
Kathy Davidson
01:10:38
I know that HeadStarts have a mandatory component about walking
Kurt Kaminer
01:10:50
https://iwalksafe.org/virtuallearning/
Alex Engel, NACTO
01:11:37
Unfortunately, FHWA has missed their own MUTCD deadlines before. That said, we're optimistic that we'll see an updated MUTCD by May 2023 -- FHWA continues to state that they'll have a new manual out by then.
ELAINE OLMOS
01:11:39
thank you